Support systems for testing thin meniscus optical mirrors

  • Iranijad, B.; Parks, R. E.; Lam, P.
  • Abstract: 

    The principles of elastic structural behavior and superposition were  used  in  conjunction  with  finite  element analysis  to  find  a  suitable  test  support  system   for   thin  meniscus  mirrors.   The finite  element  method   was  used to  calculate  the  deflections  of  a  thi.n   meniscus  mirror  supported  by   various  mechanisms.    The support systems were explicitly  represented  in  the  finite  element  model  by  including  the  forces  and moments  that  are  induced  by the  support system.

    To  minimize  the  number  of  finite  element  runs,  the  basic  loading  cases  were  analyzed  one at   a  time,  and  the  deflections   in  each  case  were  fit    to Zernike  polynomials. To represent the effect of each support  system  on  the  optical  surface,  the  basic  loading  cases  were  combined  by  using  the  appropriate proportions   of   the  Zernike polynomial  coefficients. The analytical results favored airbag support over other possible support systems. If the pressure in the airbag is  varied  in  a  controlled  manner,  optical  errors  maybe separated out from the mechanical errors  caused  by  an  imperfect  support  system  even  for  optical  elements  of  a very   high   diameter-to-thickness   ratio   or asymmetric   shapes. Using holographic techniques, several sets of experimental results were obtained that strongly confirmed the analytical findings.

     

    Year:

    1981

    Journal:

    Proc. SPIE

    Volume:

    306

    Pages:

    131-136

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