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Point Source Microscope

A COMPLETE, SELF-CONTAINED, PORTABLE METROLOGY SYSTEM


● The PSM comes as a complete system ready to use as soon as the computer boots.
● The PSMAlign, LabView based, software is easy to use and the source code is available.
● The centroid data is available for external feedback to other systems or the centroid data can be stored for later use.
● Full field video microscope images and point source Star images can be saved in png format for later analysis and use.

$23,950.00
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Think of the PSM as a Swiss Army Knife for your Lab

Think of the PSM as a Swiss Army Knife for your Lab

Nearly as precise as an interferometer, yet far more flexible and easy to use due to its small size, light weight and powerful software.

Unique features of the Point Source Microscope (PSM)

The PSM is an unusually flexible optical test instrument with many unique features that set it  apart from other optical test instruments. This is why we call it the “Swiss Army Knife” of  optical instruments.

As opposed to most optical test instruments, the PSM is lightweight and has a small physical footprint. This means the PSM is used and mounted in places many other instruments cannot be  used because of their size and mass. The PSM is easily mounted on a common xyz stage found in most optical labs and shops, and is easily built into other optical test instrumentation. 

The PSM is multiple instruments in one like the Swiss Army Knife; used with a microscope objective it is an autostigmatic microscope useful for measuring radii of curvature and optical  alignment among other uses, while used without an objective it is an autocollimator with a small  aperture that is particularly useful for measuring errors in small prisms and windows.

The PSM is sensitive to a very wide range of intensities due to an adjustable internal laser diode  light source and an adjustable camera. The internal source has a bright mode for aligning the  PSM under ambient lighting of about 0.3mW and an adjustable range to avoid camera saturation  of 25 μW down to 25 pW. The camera shutter is controllable over a range of 1000 and has a gain  of 10. This gives a total dynamic range of intensities of easily handled of about 108.  

While on the subject of intensity, the PSM is a Class I laser device so it may be used without laser safety restrictions as long as the PSM case remains closed. If additional power is needed the PSM may be coupled to an external light source via a single mode fiber. In addition, this feature  gives the flexibility to use the PSM at any desired wavelength from 350 nm to over 2 μm.  Clearly the PSM is not optimized over this wavelength range but it can still be used productively  over this range (and with the appropriate camera for use beyond 1 μm). 

In addition to being an autostigmatic microscope, the PSM is also a full field video microscope that is parfocal with the autostigmatic focus so you can see where the reflected spot focus is coming from. This is useful in case the reflected spot appears asymmetrical where it should not.  The microscope may be focused on contamination or a defect in the surface being examined. 

The sensitivity to focused spot motion is adjustable by changing objectives. While the PSM is supplied with a 10x objective, it will work with any infinity corrected objective from 100x to 2x.  For even lower magnification and wider field of view, a simple plano-convex lens with an efl up to 150 mm may be used with the expected loss of lateral sensitivity. 

Finally, just like a Swiss Army Knife, the PSM is completely portable. It has two USB cables to a laptop computer that is supplied with the PSM and is powered by the laptop which has the  PSM Align software installed. The PSM is ready to use when received. Plug in the two USB cables, boot the computer, click on the PSM icon (be a little patient), and the video screen  appears. You are now ready to work.

 

EASY SYSTEM ALIGNMENT

EASY SYSTEM ALIGNMENT

Optical alignment means positioning optically significant features like centers of curvatures and foci precisely where the optical design specifies.

The PSM enables this process by detecting and locating these optical features on the micrometer level and then relating them to mechanical fixtures, datums and features such as steel balls.

The PSM bridges the gap between optically significant features that cannot be mechanically probed and mechanical hardware such as bores, seats and mounts that can be located by conventional mechanical means.

Center and Align with One Tool

The Point Source Microscope makes optical system alignment easy and deterministic, letting you perfectly align each component’s center-of-curvature and on-axis focused beam to the exact specifications. With both bright field imaging and autostigmatic microscopy, the PSM lets you align all optically important features quickly. Ergonomic features such as a bright laser diode setting make alignment simple, even in full room light. 

The PSM lets you align the actual optical features, rather than relying on mechanical datums, so you can relax mechanical tolerances on your optics and mounts to reduce system costs. Use the PSM for everything from simple optics to complex systems such as Offner relays, atmospheric error correction systems and off-axis telescopes.

The PSM is invaluable for aligning aspheric optics, including off-axis aspheres. The PSM locates point images and shows the image shape as a star test.  This unique system reduces alignment error to near zero by keeping the image in the correct location while adjusting the asphere to minimize aberrations.

 

ASPHERE ALIGNMENT

ASPHERE ALIGNMENT

The PSM is also valuable for aligning aspheres and off-axis aspheres by using the aberrations aspheres produce when they are misaligned.

The PSM sees the reflected or transmitted Star image produced by the optical element or system in real time so there is optimum visual feedback as adjustments in alignment are made.

Since the PSM is sensitive to wavefront errors of as little as 8th wave rapid adjustment is made to near perfect alignment as witnessed by a symmetric image viewed going through focus.

Rapidly Inspect Lens Quality

The PSM serves as an excellent incoming quality inspection tool, enabling fast verification of image shape, with λ/8 sensitivity, so you can easily resolve out-of specification optics without the expense or complication of using an interferometer. Further, the PSM can measure radius of curvature for production control, verify whether a lens meets specifications, or verify that a lens is correctly oriented. The PSM can even be mounted on a CMM for precise, non-contact x-y-z location.

 

OTHER OPTICAL METROLOGY USES

OTHER OPTICAL METROLOGY USES

Picture of PSM aligning an off-axis parabola to a fiber feed using a plane mirror

In addition to its use for alignment, the PSM is useful for incoming inspection for radius of curvature, focal length, figure errors larger than 8th wave and centering errors.

Used as an autocollimator by removing the objective lens, the wedge in windows and parallelism of prism faces can be measured with 1 arc second precision.

The small beam size makes it particularly useful for small prisms.

Note on using PSM with other light sources

We are often asked if the PSM can be used at wavelengths other than the standard internal laser diode and LED sources at 635 nm. The answer is definitely yes by coupling in an external fiber feed light source.

The PSM performs to original specifications all the way from 405 to 1080 nm without any modification.

This makes the PSM useful for aligning laser diode sources to other components in an optical system, for example. The useful spectral range for the PSM may be even greater, we simply have not tried over an even broader range.

 

Specifications Applications

System Type

Portable, high-resolution video microscope

Probe

Non-contact, 3D distance measuring probe for x-y-z stage or CMM

Objectives

10X Nikon standard; 4X or 20X optional

Objective Mounts

Nikon M25 standard; rms, Mitutoyo, C-mount,  Thorlabs SM1 and Right Angle Adapter optional

Working Distance

> 17 mm with 10x objective

Lateral Sensitivity

±0.5 mm range, 0.1μm sensitivity with 10X objective

Axial Sensitivity

±2 μm with 10x objective

Angular Sensitivity

± 1.4° range, ±1 arc second sensitivity when used as an autocollimator (no objective)

Video Camera

FLIR BlackflyS, 1440 x 1080 pixels 3.45 um pixels, 10 bit mono,  >30 fps via USB3.1; other C/CS mount cameras color or mono optional

Light Sources

Internal: full field 635 nm LED and laser diode point source, software controlled  

Bright setting of laser diode for ambient lighting initial alignment  

External: FC/APC connector for user supplied external fiber source Works from 405 to 1080 nm

Options

  • Optical Centering Station 

  • Bench rail 

  • Custom fixturing

Computer

Dell laptop with USB3 interface, Windows 10 standard; desktop computer optional

Interfaces

All USB3

Software

PSMAlignTM software for real-time alignment and Control (LabVIEWTM license included)

Weight

600 grams including10X objective and camera

Dimensions

189 x 107 x 31 mm deep with objective and camera

PSM Users

Point Source Microscope PSM Users include:
FLIR, Boeing, Goodrich, Raytheon, Melles Griot, ASML, L3, Kreischer Optics, NKFUST, Penn and Bro.

Bibliography: Archival papers describing a variety of applications of the PSM

“A simple tool for alignment and wavefront testing”, W. P. Kuhn, Opt-E, Proc SPIE 66760F, doi: 10.1117/12.735477. Paper discusses methods of quantifying wavefront error using a PSM., Proc. SPIE 883804, doi:10.1117/12.2024599. Paper discusses the use of the MFT to take surface topography maps of window and lens surfaces.
“A simple tool for alignment and wavefront testing: experimental results”, W. P. Kuhn, Opt-E, Proc. SPIE 70680C, doi: 10.1117/12.798224. Paper shows experimental results of using a PSM and phase retrieval methods to measure wavefront error.
“A toolbox of metrology-based techniques for optical system alignment”, P. Coulter, NASA GSFC, Proc. SPIE 9951-7, Paper discusses many familiar optical alignment tools including the PSM.
“Alignment and use of the optical test for the 8.4 m off-axis primary mirrors of the Giant Magellan Telescope”, S. West, et. al., Steward Observatory and College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc. SPIE 77390N, doi:10.1117/12.857251. Paper shows several uses of the PSM in the alignment of the test optics for the GMT mirror metrology including a PSM permanently built into the test optics.
“Alignment of four-mirror wide field corrector for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope”, C. J. Oh, et. al., College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc. SPIE 884403, doi:10.1117/12.2023427. Papers shows the use of the PSM on the ram of a CMM for precise positioning of fiducial CGHs in alignment fixtures.
“Aspheric and freeform surfaces metrology with software configurable optical test system: a computerized reverse Hartmann test”, P. Su, et. al, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Opt. Eng. 53, 031305, DOI: 10.1117/1.OE.53.3.031305. Paper shows the use of the PSM to precisely align the components of reflection deflectometry tests in conjunction with a CMM and a laser tracker.
“Centration of optical elements”, E. Milby & J. Burge, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc. SPIE 812616, doi:10.1117/12.894126. Paper describes using the PSM in both the autostigmatic and autocollimation modes for centering lens elements on a rotary table.
“Delivery, Installation, On-sky Verification of the Hobby Eberly Telescope Wide Field Corrector”, H. Lee, et. al., Univ. of Texas at Austin, Proc. SPIE 990646, doi:10.1117/12.2231224. Paper shows of the use of PSM to align the mirrors within the Wide Field Corrector.
“Design and analysis of an alignment procedure using CGHs”, L. Coyle, M. Dubin & J. Burge, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Opt. Eng. 52, 084104, doi: 10.1117/1.OE.52.8.084104. Paper shows use of the PSM in autostigmatic mode to find points in space produced by a CGH in reflection.
“Design and development of the fibre cable and fore optics of the HERMES Spectrograph for the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT)”, J. Brzeski, S. Case & L. Gers, Australian Astronomical Observatory, Proc. SPIE 812504, doi:10.1117/12.896389. Paper describes using the PSM to precisely position fibers that form the curved slit in the spectrograph.
“Design and implementation of a new time-delayed source and alignment considerations for a tangent ogive interferometer”, H. Durazo, et. al., Breault Research Organization, Proc. SPIE 730215, doi: 10.1117/12.818385. Paper shows the use of the PSM to align a multi-armed interferometer to a common point in space.
“Design of head-mounted binoculars utilizing freeform surfaces”, R. R. Boye, et. al., Sandia National Laboratory, Opt. Eng. 53, 031310, doi:10.1117/1.OE.53.3.031310. Paper describes using the PSM to help align the free form optics in the binoculars.
“Design of Wearable Binoculars with On-Demand Zoom”, R. R. Boye, et. al., Sandia National Laboratory, Proc. SPIE 88410H, doi: 10.1117/12.2024619 . Paper describes using the PSM to help align the free form optics in the binoculars.
“Development of surface metrology for the GMT primary mirror”, J. Burge, et. al., College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc. SPIE 701814, doi: 10.1117/12.790082. Paper describes using the PSM to alignment the null CGH in the null optics for the GMT primary mirror.
“Dynamic distortion calibration using a Diffracting Pupil”, E. Bendek, et. al., Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Proc SPIE 81510U, doi: 10.1117/12.893130. Paper describes the use of the PSM to align an off-axis parabola to a pinhole to give diffraction limited performance.
“Fabrication and testing of the first 8.4 m off-axis segment for the Giant Magellan Telescope”, H. Martin, et. al., Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona, Proc. SPIE 77390A, doi: 10.1117/12.857494. Paper shows how the PSM was an integral part of the alignment of the test optics for the GMT metrology.
“Final acceptance testing of the LSST monolithic primary/tertiary mirror”, M. Tuell, et. al., Steward Observatory, Univ. of Arizona and National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Proc. SPIE 91510W, doi:10.1117/12.2057076. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to measure the alignment of the optical axes of the two surfaces of the LSST primary/tertiary mirror.
“First light results from the High Efficiency and Resolution Multi-Element Spectrograph for Anglo-Australian Telescope”, A. Sheinis, et. al., Australian Astronomical Observatory, et. al., JATIS 035002, doi: 10.1117/1.JATIS.1.3.035002. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to bring the various arms of the spectrograph into alignment with each other.
“GMTIFS: The Adaptive Optics Beam Steering Mirror for the GMT Integral-Field Spectrograph”, J. Davies, et. al., Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Proc. SPIE 991217, doi:10.1117/12.2231560. Paper describes the use of the PSM to produce a pseudo guide star on which to align the spectrometer optics.
“Hermes – the engineering challenges”, J. Brzeski, S. Case & L. Gers, Australian Astronomical Observatory, Proc SPIE 84464N, doi:10.1117/12.924635. Paper discusses the centering of lenses within a barrel using the PSM and a rotary table. It also discusses using the PSM to locate the assembled lens within a fixture using a CMM.
“High Numerical Aperture Multimode Fibers for Prime Focus Use”, K. Zhang, J. Zheng & W. Sanders, Australian Astronomical Observatory and Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, Proc SPIE 99125J, doi: 10.1117/12.2232131. Paper discusses using the PSM to center a diffraction limited spot in the center of a multimode optical fiber to less than one micrometer.
“High-accuracy aspheric x-ray mirror metrology using Software Configurable Optical Test System/deflectometry”, R. Huang, et. al., College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Opt. Eng. 54, 084103, doi: 10.1117/1.OE.54.8.084103. Paper discusses use of the PSM to measure the locations of the camera and screen in a reflection deflectometry test setup.
“KOALA, a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope: assembly and commissioning”, R. Zhelem, et. al., Australian Astronomical Observatory and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Proc SPIE 91473K, doi: 10.1117/12.2055588. Paper discusses using the PSM to align optical fibers to a micro-lens array.
“Low uncertainty alignment procedure using computer generated holograms”, L. Coyle, M. Dubin & J. Burge, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc SPIE 81310B, doi: 10.1117/12.895237. Paper describes using the PSM to align two computer generated holograms to each other in transmission.
“Optical alignment with computer generated holograms”, J. Burge, R. Zehnder, C. Zhao, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc SPIE 66760C, doi: 10.1117/12.735853. Paper discusses using computer generated holograms to create points in space for alignment purposes that can be viewed in reflection by a PSM or interferometer.
“Optomechanical design and tolerance of a microscope objective at 121.6 nm”, D. Keyes, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc SPIE 957506, doi: 10.1117/12.2188803. Paper discusses using a PSM and rotary table to align the mirrors in a reflecting microscope objective.
“Progress in manufacturing the first 8.4 m off-axis segment for the GMT”, H. Martin, et. al., Steward Observatory and College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc SPIE 70180C, doi: 10.1117/12.789805. Paper shows how the PSM is an integral part the alignment of the optics used to test the GMT segments.
“Progress on the GMT”, M. Johns, Carnegie Observatories, Proc SPIE 701213, doi: 10.1117/12.788063. Paper points out the use of the PSM in the alignment of the test optics for the GMT mirrors.
“Research on the Measurement Technology of Effective Arm Length of Swing Arm Profilometer”, L. Chen, et. al., Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu, Proc SPIE 92800P, doi: 10.1117/12.2070673. Paper discusses using the PSM to measure the relationship of the swing arm probe tip to references on a coordinate measuring machine.
“Research on the relationship of the probe system for the swing arm profilometer based on the point source microscope”, M. Gao, et. al., Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu, Proc SPIE 96230N, doi: 10.1117/12.2186280. Paper discusses using the PSM to measure the relationship of the swing arm probe tip to laser tracker SMRs.
“Scanning pentaprism test for the GMT 8.4 m off-axis segments”, R. Allen, et. al, Steward Observatory and College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc SPIE 773911, doi: 10.1117/12.857901. Paper discusses using the PSM to measure the position of the camera detector array chip to SMRs mounted on the outside of the camera.
“SITELLE optical design, assembly, and testing”, D. Brousseau, et. al., Département de physique, génie physique et optique (COPL), Université Laval, Département de physique (CRAQ), Université de Montréal, Montréal, Proc SPIE 91473Z, doi: 10.1117/12.2055214. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to align the two halves of a Fourier Transform Spectrometer and to measure the point spread function of the instrument.
“Swing arm optical coordinate-measuring machine: high precision measuring ground aspheric surfaces using a laser triangulation probe:, Y. Wang, et. al., College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Opt. Eng. 51, 073603, doi: 10.1117/1.OE.51.7.073603. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to relate the focus of the triangulation sensor to laser tracker SMRs mounted to the sensor.
“Swing-arm optical coordinate measuring machine: modal estimation of systematic errors from dual probe shear measurements”, P. Su, et. al., College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Opt. Eng. 51, 043604, doi: 10.1117/1.OE.51.4.043604. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to measure the position of the fiber optic probe tips to laser tracker SMRs mounted on the swing arm.
“The deterministic optical alignment of the HERMES spectrograph”, L. Gers & N Staszak, Australian Astronomical Observatory, Proc SPIE 915113, doi:10.1117/12.2055574. Paper discusses using the PSM to define the optical axis of the spectrometer and to align the various arms of the spectrometer to a common axis.
“Use of a commercial laser tracker for optical alignment”, J. Burge, et. al., College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc SPIE 66760F, doi: 10.1117/12.736705. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to aid in locating nests for laser tracker SMRs relative to other features on optics or fixtures that need to be aligned.
“Using the Point Source Microscope (PSM) to find conjugates of parabolic and elliptical off-axis mirrors”, R. Parks & M. Borden, College of Optical Sciences, Univ. of Arizona, Proc. SPIE 81310A, doi:10.1117/12.894333. Paper discusses the use of the PSM to locate the tangential and sagittal centers of curvature of off-axis conic mirrors and the axes of rotation of toroidal mirrors and measure their radii of curvature.

Case Studies & Testimonials

  • "We are enjoying our Point Source Microscope and finding it invaluable in alignment and diagnostic tasks."

    Dr. John Mitchell
    Senior Optical Metrologist
    Glyndwr Innovations Ltd., St. Asaph, Wales, UK

     

  • "Just wanted to share a recent success aligning an adaptive optics test bed with the PSM. We used to use a traditional alignment telescope in the past, but the PSM made the whole process really easy and fast. The main requirements were to quickly determine the quality of beam collimation and pupil conjugates since there are several beam expanders and compressors with multiple pupil and focal planes."

    Suresh Sivanandam
    Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics
    University of Toronto

     

  • "You are always responsive and give us lots of useful information!!"

    Dr. Shaojie Chen
    Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics
    University of Toronto

     

  • "As always we are very much loving the instrument, I personally love the camera upgrade from what I'm used to!"

    Weslin Pullen
    Hart Scientific Consulting International, LLC
    Tucson, Arizona

     

OPG Customers

Worldwide Representatives

FOR SALES IN CHINA PLEASE CONTACT:

FOR SALES IN CHINA PLEASE CONTACT:
OPTurn Company Ltd
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Beijing, China
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FOR SALES IN ALL OTHER ASIAN COUNTRIES PLEASE CONTACT:

FOR SALES IN ALL OTHER ASIAN COUNTRIES PLEASE CONTACT:

清 原 耕 輔   Kosuke Kiyohara
清原光学 営業部   Kiyohara Optics / Sales
+81-3-5918-8501
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Kiyohara Optics Inc.
3-28-10 Funado Itabashi-Ku Tokyo, Japan 174-0041

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FOR SALES IN UK & EU PLEASE CONTACT

Armstrong Optical

+44(0) 1604 654220

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